The Washington Times-Herald

Community News Network

July 26, 2013

Blaming full moon for sleep troubles not seen as lunacy

LONDON — A full moon may be to blame for sleepless nights after all.

Scientists at the University of Basel, Switzerland say they have found the first reliable evidence that sleep patterns are influenced by lunar changes. The study, published in Current Biology, shows brain activity related to deep sleep in volunteers dropped by 30 percent around the full moon. The study subjects also took longer to fall asleep and had shorter nights.

"It could be important," said Eric Chudler, executive director of the Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering at the University of Washington in Seattle. The researchers aren't "saying the moon controls the person's sleep pattern, they're saying the body has an internal clock that's similar to the lunar cycle. It's different to the traditional myth."

The full moon has been blamed for murder and mayhem since ancient times. The term lunacy was coined in the 16th century to refer to an intermittent form of insanity believed to be related to the moon. For generations, people around the world have passed down tales of werewolves and other moon-related curses. Scientists have attempted over the years to discover a link between the satellite's impact and human behavior. These latest findings may provide a boost to the field.

Researchers at the Centre for Chronobiology at the Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Basel originally set out to examine 33 volunteers' circadian rhythms, which are physical, mental and behavioral changes that respond to light and darkness over a 24-hour cycle.

One evening at a pub several years later, the research team began talking about how the moon, which was shining full that night, could affect sleep. Christian Cajochen, head of the Centre for Chronobiology, said he came to realize several of the scientists believed there could be an impact. The team decided to go back over their study data, which included electroencephalograms of patients' non-rapid-eye-movement sleep and hormone secretions related to sleep, and match it up with a lunar calendar.

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