The Washington Times-Herald

May 23, 2013

Dollar General focuses on reading

Lindsay Owens
Washington Times Herald

WASHINGTON — The Dollar General Literacy Foundation announced an award of $7,800 to the Washington Carnegie Public Library to support the new adult literacy program being now being offered.

“At Dollar General, we are passionate about our mission of “Serving Others” throughout the communities we serve,” said Rick Dreiling, chairman and CEO of Dollar General.

“It’s exciting to see the Dollar General Literacy Foundation’s outreach in action as we partner with organizations to further education and literacy and make a real difference in people’s lives.”

The Dollar General Literacy Foundation, celebrating its 20th anniversary, supports initiatives that help others improve their lives through literacy and education. Since 1993, the Dollar General Literacy Foundation has awarded more than $81 million in grants to nonprofit organizations.

The grants have helped more than 4.7 million individuals continue their education and improve their literacy.

“There are very few gifts that last a lifetime.  Literacy is one of them. It empowers individuals to increase their potential as parents, employees, and community members.

“We applaud the Dollar General Literacy Foundation’s recognition of the role Washington’s library plays in building their community,” said Teresa Heidenreich, library director.

“Because of the Foundation's generosity, our library will have additional funds to build the adult literacy collection, offer extended training to volunteer tutors, and raise visibility of this life-changing library service,” said Teresa Heidenreich, library director.

Seven other adult literacy programs in Indiana were awarded grants including two programs in Indianapolis and one each in Evansville, Bloomington, Angola, Portage and Mishawaka.

The Literacy Foundation grants must be applied for by nonprofit organizations that provide direct services to adults in need of literacy assistance. The winning organizations must offer held in one of many instructional areas; adult basic education, GED or high school equivalency preparation or English Language Acquisition.

In April, the Washington library started an adult literacy program that aims to improve the literacy rate in Daviess County. Currently, one in 10 adults in the county struggles with reading. With a 10 percent illiteracy rate, Daviess County ranks 9th highest.

Literacy program volunteers have been trained to help those interested in improving literacy skills.

For more information on the Washington Carnegie Public Library or the adult literacy program, contact the library at 254-4586 or visit www.washingtonpubliclibrary.org.