The Washington Times-Herald

July 8, 2013

Amish discuss road worries

By Nate Smith
Washington Times Herald

MONTGOMERY — Members of Daviess County’s Amish community came to the Produce Auction barn Monday to discuss road conditions with the Daviess County Commissioners.

Namely, the rock on the road. Many of the men at the special meeting believe the rock on the road is causing horses to come up lame.

“It’s serious, those horses cannot roll on the rock,” Steven Stoll said.

Stoll, and many other Amish men like him, believe the size of the rock, known as No. 5, are too big for the horses to trot on. He said if a horse steps on the large rocks the right way, the horse will develop bruises and cause it to be lame.

Veterinarian Matt Lyons agreed with Stoll, saying he has seen an increased in lamed horses due to bruising on the sole of the hoof, where it is the softest.

“It’s really heartbreaking to tell a family who has a great driving horse not to use it anymore,” Lyons said.

And for the Amish, a lame horse means a lot.

“For an Amish family, a good horse is something important,” Stoll said.

The Amish men in attendance believed a smaller rock would be better for the community’s horses. The commissioners agreed.

“I feel bad about it and I’m going to solve the situation,” Commissioner Larry Wilson said.

Wilson also said he felt he was to blame for part of the problem because he asked county highway workers to keep a lot of stone on the road.

Several buckets of rock were brought by county Highway Superintendent Phil Cornelius. It was decided between the Amish men present that No. 8 stone, a smaller size of stone, would be used. Cornelius said using the smaller stone would be more expensive, but he would not know how much until it was in use.

The commissioners and Cornelius said they would use the smaller stone in areas where there is a lot of horse traffic, but it could take time to get every road in the Amish community.

“It’s going to take some time,” Cornelius said.

“We’re going to start working on it,” Commissioner Tony Wichman said.

Health department

The commissioners approved an ordinance raising document fees at the Health Department. Copies for birth and death certificates will rise to $10 from $8.

County Health Nurse Kathy Sullender said the rise in the fees was needed due to a state-mandated rise in fees for death certificates and increased costs in supplies. Fees have stayed the same since 2008.

Bennington Levee committee

Due to a change in state law, the commissioners are allowed to make an appointment to the Bennington Levee committee. In effect on July 1, commissioners and county councils can make appointments to the board because counties do have financial oversight on the levee boards.

Last month, the county settled its lawsuit with the Bennington Levee committee for repayment of funds to repair the levee after a 2011 breach.

The commissioners appointed Wichman to a four-year term on the board.

More updates on the meeting later on www.washtimesherald.com and in Wednesday’s edition.