The Washington Times-Herald

August 23, 2013

No bones about it

County ready for a new Community reading program

BY Lindsay Owens Times Herald
The Washington Times-Herald

---- — Fans of the TNT hit TV show "Rizzoli and Isles" will have a chance to talk with Tess Gerritsen, the best-selling crime novelist whose books inspired the series, on Oct. 5 at 7:30 p.m. in the Washington High School Auditorium.

Gerritsen's book "The Bone Garden" has been chosen as the selection for One Book One Community, a grassroots program that brings people together to discuss ideas in books.

"Community reading projects have exploded in popularity in the recent years," said Washington Carnegie Public Library Director Teresa Heidenreich. "I'm thrilled that citizens of Washington and the surrounding areas have embraced the concept of reading together as a community."

This is the second year for the Washington library to participate in One Book One Community. "The program isn't about the resulting quantitative data. It's about bring people together to discuss ideas in books and observing the breakdown of barriers between people, cultures and backgrounds. That's what makes One Book One Community a success," said Heidenreich.

Library patrons are invited to pick up a complimentary copy of "The Bone Garden" between Monday and Wednesday of next week. On Thursday any remaining copies of the book will be available to those who are not library card holders. Heidenreich said 200 free copies of the book are available. Large print, audio, and E-book downloads are also available for check-out in addition to traditional print copies.

"The Bone Garden" details the adventures of Julia Hamill after she discovers a skull buried on the grounds of her new home in rural Massachusetts. Maura Isles, a Boston medical examiner, tells Hamill she believes the skull is scarred with the unmistakable marks of murder. The novel then travels back in time to 1830, where a poor medical student starts selling dead bodies on the black market to pay for school. After a series of gruesome murders, the cadaver trafficker comes up as a prime suspect and must prove his innocence by finding the only witness.

According to a release, the book "deftly interweaves the thrilling narratives of its nineteenth and twenty-first century protagonists, tracing the dark mystery at its heart across time and place to a finale as ingeniously conceived as it is shocking."

Gerritson, who hold a M.D. from the University of California, San Francisco, published her first novel, "Call After Midnight," in 1987 and has had eight more romantic thrillers published since. Her first medical suspense novel, "Harvest," was released in 1996. Gerritson has won several awards for work including the Nero Wolfe Award. She is retired from medicine and writes full time. Indiana will be the first stop on what Gerritson hopes will be a national tour of America's libraries.

The event is free and open to the public. Prior to the discussion, the public can join the author for a catered dinner. A limited number of tickets for the dinner are available and can only be purchased in advance at the library for $25 to $40 each.

In addition to the author talk on Oct. 5, participants in the program will have the opportunity to take part in three discussion groups on Sept. 16, 26, and 30 at the Washington library and on Sept. 12 at the Plainville branch of the library.

A forensics presentation will also take place Sept. 18 at the main library. Heidi Haas, a forensic scientist with the Indiana State Police Laboratory will talk about the history of forensics and how it is used to solve crimes.

Sept. 23, Professor Lisa Rosner will present a program on her book, "The Horrid and True Story of the Burke and Hare Murders." Gerritsen's book is loosely based on the murders detailed in Rosner's book.

"Fall is the perfect season for One Book One Community. This builds off of the momentum from a successful adult summer reading program. The One Book program provides readers with continued intellectual growth through social activities and the opportunity to interact with international best-selling authors right here in Washington," said adult programming outreach manager Rick Chambon.

For more information on the One Book One Community program or to find out more about what your local library offers, call the library at 254-4586 or visit their website, www.washingtonpubliclibrary.org .

The event is free and open to the public. Prior to the discussion, the public can join the author for a catered dinner. A limited number of tickets for the dinner are available and can only be purchased in advance at the library for $25 to $40 each.