The Washington Times-Herald

October 24, 2012

Loogootee fetes athletic success

By Tim Pinkham
Washington Times-Herald

LOOGOOTEE — The Lions have roared in varsity sports so far this year.

Loogootee competes in three sports during the fall — tennis for boys, volleyball for girls and cross-country for both. Junior/Senior High School Principal John Mullen talked about the success in all three Monday night during the school and student success portion of the Loogootee School Board meeting.

Last Saturday night, Loogootee’s volleyball team defeated then No. 1-ranked Barr-Reeve to win the Loogootee Sectional. On Tuesday the Lady Lions played at Northeast Dubois in the volleyball regional, then Loogootee hosts the semi-state Saturday.

The Loogootee boys’ tennis team also won a sectional title recently.

Mullen said Zach Wagler on Saturday became the first Loogootee cross-country athlete to ever compete at semistate.

Superintendent Larry Weitkamp displayed a new 13-month 2013 calendar, which features this year’s state champion Loogootee Lions boys basketball team on the December 2012 page. The calendar was produced by Skyward, a school management systems company with clients from Minnesota to Texas, including Loogootee, as well as overseas.

In other business, the school board approved the proposed 2013 corporation budget, capital projects plan and bus replacement plan. It includes $6.9 million for the General Fund, about $1 million for capital projects and $600,000 for bus transportation.

The budget, along with a proposed tax rate of $1.47 per $100 of assessed valuation, will be forwarded to the state Department of Local Government Finance for final approval.

Weitkamp said last month he always advertises the tax rate high, knowing it will be reduced by the state once the local assessed valuation figures have been determined. He expects the final rate to be about 90 cents.

Last year Weitkamp said Loogootee advertised a rate of $1.75, but the final figure was 84 cents.

It is common for governmental entities to advertise tax rates high each year, because state law prohibits them from being raised afterwards only lowered.