It’s a bit of a stinky subject but one that can be beneficial to many farms. On Feb. 27, poultry producers are invited to attend the manure management workshop at the Martin County Fairgrounds.

Hosted by the Indiana Conservation Cropping Systems Initiative, Purdue Extension and the Martin County Soil and Water Conservation District, the free seminar will help those in poultry production learn not only more about how manure can be beneficial to the health of soil but also how to improve manure and nutrient efficiency as well as rules and regulations for manure use.

“We are able to offer this through a grant we received from Perdue,” said Jessica Hoeh, with ICCSI. “There are a large amount of poultry producers in this area, so we thought this would be a great place to offer the workshop.”

The free event, which does require advanced registration, begins with registration at 8:30 a.m. Speakers will begin at 9 a.m. and include Indiana Soil Health Specialist Stephanie McLain, State Conservationist and Agronomist Tony Bailey, Indiana Agriculture Nutrient Alliance Executive Director Ben Wicker, Indiana Farm Bureau Livestock Specialist Greg Slipher and Office of the Indiana State Chemist Fertilize Program Administrator Matt Pearson.

A similar event held in Martin County about five years ago drew a crowd of over 80 — the facility’s capacity.

“As a producer, I see an effective way to utilize a by-product of livestock production in order to improve my bottom line as a grain farmer. Adding organic material and essential nutrients to the ground to improve soil health for grain production is simple and cost-effective as it reduces our use of commercial fertilizer,” said Amy Burris, a livestock producer, grain farmer and vice chair of the Indiana State Soil Conservation Board. “As a soil conservation advocate, I can say that the correct use of manure as a nutrient supply, along with other soil improvement techniques — no-till planting, cover crop usage, proper drainage — is a cost-effective way to improve soil health, leaving it better than we found it for future generations.”

In addition to the workshop that will wrap up around 12:30, producers and farmers can earn private applicator recertification program or PARP credits for a fee of $10. Certified crop advisor and other credit opportunities are also available.

Those interested in registering for the workshop can do so online at 2020manuremanagement.eventbrite.com or by calling the Martin County Soil and Water Conservation District at 812-295-3149.

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